Garden Update

The garden! Perennial border area (which is very weedy in this pic) has been planted so far with two currents, a gooseberry/josta berry hybrid, some sorrel, strawberries and echinacea. Some ornamentals line the area closest to the sidewalk

Hi! This is a garden update! In my last post it was all just a dream on paper, the colored circles holding the place of the real greenery that is out there now! I really don’t think it could be going any better, considering this is my first time doing anything like this. I look outside and am amazed at what’s growing, and most of it like gangbusters. It started with kale at the beginning of June, then continued with collards, dill, sage, mustard greens, edible marigolds, calendula, nasturtiums, baby greens, some radishes, broccoli, two heads of cabbage (one big, one little). Now we are full on into pole beans, cucumbers, cherry tomatoes,summer squash, onions and zucchini (we call our GIGANTIC plants “the giant zucchini machine”).  Coming on strong on are eggplants and one regular tomato plant (one didn’t do so well). Plugging along is my little polyculture, which I’ve struggled with a bit. Mainly because I don’t know the difference between radish tops, turnip tops, and certain baby greens. A lot of the radishes went to flower…not sure if it was because they didn’t have enough space? I got, like, 4. But I got tons of baby greens (lettuces and mustard greens) for salad for several weeks. The carrots and parsley are coming up now, as well as little parsnip leaves. I had one potato plant come up (I planted 4 seed potatoes) and just harvested three little potatoes. I’ll have to try again with those.

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My Permaculture-based Garden Plan

Hullo! Long time no blog. I have been so busy doing stuff that I haven’t had time to write about it. Isn’t that always the way?

Well, spring is here, and I have my permaculture-based garden plan all set and ready to go. The funny thing is, I have never had ANY kind of garden, much less something permaculture-based. I have a sneaking suspicion it’s kind of ambitious for a newbie, but that’s just the way I roll. If I can’t do some of it or don’t have time…so be it.

So some of the site considerations I needed to take into account with this plan are:

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The Nation-State Has Got to Go, or Everybody Permaculture!

I’ve been meditating on this idea of the nation-state for a while. A gentleman that came to our Massachusetts Zeitgeist Day event in Cambridge last March commented that unless we get rid of the idea of nation-states, we will never have peace on the planet. I completely agree, and I wanted to just write a post about it as it’s been on my mind. It’s especially pertinent now, as it seems war with Syria (and whatever slippery-slope conflicts emerge from that) might be inevitable.

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Nothing on TV?: Thursday, June 6

Lee Camp, Moment of Clarity #238
Youtube description: Opening your eyes to the influences controlling our behaviors takes many steps. This is the first one. It’s perhaps the key to everything.

Breaking Free, Episode 1

http://breakingfree.tv/episode/tree-tops-to-roof-tops/

The World According to Monsanto
If you know nothing or next to nothing about Monsanto, this is the film to watch. It’s staggering.

Youtube description: There’s nothing they are leaving untouched: the mustard, the okra, the bringe oil, the rice, the cauliflower. Once they have established the norm: that seed can be owned as their property, royalties can be collected. We will depend on them for every seed we grow of every crop we grow. If they control seed, they control food, they know it — it’s strategic. It’s more powerful than bombs. It’s more powerful than guns. This is the best way to control the populations of the world. The story starts in the White House, where Monsanto often got its way by exerting disproportionate influence over policymakers via the “revolving door”. One example is Michael Taylor, who worked for Monsanto as an attorney before being appointed as deputy commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1991. While at the FDA, the authority that deals with all US food approvals, Taylor made crucial decisions that led to the approval of GE foods and crops. Then he returned to Monsanto, becoming the company’s vice president for public policy.

Thanks to these intimate links between Monsanto and government agencies, the US adopted GE foods and crops without proper testing, without consumer labeling and in spite of serious questions hanging over their safety. Not coincidentally, Monsanto supplies 90 percent of the GE seeds used by the US market. Monsanto’s long arm stretched so far that, in the early nineties, the US Food and Drugs Agency even ignored warnings of their own scientists, who were cautioning that GE crops could cause negative health effects. Other tactics the company uses to stifle concerns about their products include misleading advertising, bribery and concealing scientific evidence.

Nothing on TV?: June 5, 2013

I am going to start a new feature on the blog! Everyday I am going to post the videos that my husband and I watch in the evenings. Instead of watching primetime TV (which I used to do all the time), we now fill our evenings with informative, weird, fun and out-there nonfiction videos, movies and documentaries. Of course, sometimes the Bruins, Sox or the Celtics take precedent, but that’s cool because, hey, we live in the best sports town in ‘Merica and sometimes you gotta watch the boys.

Here were last nights selections! Right now it will be a lot of permaculture selections, as I have to (and want to!) watch these for the permaculture course I am taking in August. These are both fine to watch around children, by the way.

The Cosmic Giggle (this was AWESOME)

The Cosmic Giggle is an experimental documentary film that explores the human energy field’s dynamic relationship with our environment. Naturally as human beings, we are connected to a vast network of fluid information inherent to the world around us. When we are children, we are open to this field through simple innocent observance, but because of our collective evolution towards a dominating and fixated worldview, this perception becomes veiled. This film reveals how this process takes place and provides keys for returning to a more primal and authentic experience of our reality.

Temperate Permaculture Strategies, Parts 1-8

Permaculture in cool climates with Bill Mollison (he’s one of the founders of the idea of permaculture)

O Soupy on Holdy

My last post where I mentioned I had a big announcement was a little preemptive. I assumed, which always makes an ass out of me, but oh well. The announcement was going to be about a social endeavor I want to start based on the workings of a gift economy. I had entered a contest called Start Something That Matters, sponsored by GOODIS and TOMS Shoes, where you could win $50,000 to start your social endeavor. I got all sorts of excited and made a video about the pay-what-you-can soup business I want to start and entered. And waited. And the day the contest was supposed to start (last Friday), I got an email telling me I hadn’t made it to the voting round.

BOOOOOOOO.

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The Gift Economy in Action

I have an exciting post for tomorrow, and this will serve as the teaser. I found this amazing story of enacting the gift economy today on Facebook, and it made me cry.

This was a graduation speech given at a Silicon Vally private high school by Nipun Mehta. An excerpt:

The First Key Is To Give 

In the movie Wall Street — which originally came out well before you guys were born — there’s a character named Gordon Gekko whose credo in life reads: Greed is good.  When I was about your age, Silicon Valley was in the seductive grip of the dot-com boom. It was a time when it was easy to believe that Greed was Good. But a small group of us had a different hypothesis:

*Maybe* greed is good, but Generosity is better.

We tested that hypothesis. When I started ServiceSpace, our first project was to build websites for nonprofits at no charge. We ended up building and gifting away thousands of sites, but that wasn’t our main goal. Our real purpose was to practice generosity.

In the early days, the media was pretty sure we had a hidden agenda. “We’re doing this just to practice giving with no strings attached,” we said. The few who actually believed us didn’t think we could sustain it. The thing is — we did. A decade later, when our work started attracting millions of viewers, entrepreneurs told us that we’d be crazy to not slap on ads or try to monetize our services.  The thing is — we didn’t.  We probably *were* a bit crazy. And when we started Karma Kitchen, people really thought “No way!”  It was a restaurant where your check always read zero, with this note: “Your meal is paid for by someone before you, and now it’s your chance to pay it forward.”  The thing is — 25 thousand meals later, the chain continues in several cities around the globe.

I encourage you to check out the links in his speech above, and to go read the whole thing. He is inspiring and it couldn’t have been better timing for what I am announcing tomorrow!

Peace and love!

 

March Against Monsanto

Hubs and I went to the March Against Monsanto in downtown Boston yesterday. It was a decent turnout even tho the weather felt more like October. I hate this company and I hate that somehow they have managed to completely fool our government into thinking their products are necessary and safe. Really, the only things we can do at this point is grow our own food, buy organic, continue to demand labeling and banning these weirdo crops with things like pesticides spliced into their genes.

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The Fall, Hell on Earth and How to Remedy It

We have created a hell on Earth. Most of us remain blinded to its firey prison, but it’s here. Most of you reading this are probably only in the outer circle of hell, not the very center of the agony. You may have to work 8–10 hrs a day at a job you hate to pay your mortgage, but you have a house. You may worry that you won’t have enough to leave your kid when you die, but your kid eats three meals a day, has people to love it and people to teach it. You think your life doesn’t have much point, but you get enough joy in the few hours you get to spend with your friends and family to keep you ticking. You may medicate heavily with alcohol, pot or pharmaceuticals, but all in the name of unwinding, relaxing, kicking back. Yes, this is only the outside circle of hell.

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